The previous volume rectified much of what was wrong with Daredevil’s life, but not everything. Something he isn’t aware of is that his girlfriend has been convinced he’s delusional and has set Spider-Man on his trail. This, though, isn’t your friendly neighbourhood Spider-Man and Daredevil’s chum, but the Superior Spider-Man and no-one’s chum. If you’re not aware of the difference, why spoil the surprise.

What’s generally an otherwise upbeat chapter concludes with an unpleasant revelation, and that’s a plot that will dip in and out of the remainder of this Daredevil run. It’s also a matter that keeps Daredevil from letting his own problems overwhelm him. Among the other trials faced are both dogs and kids from a gang treated with chemicals that appear to have duplicated the experiment that bestowed Matt Murdock with the advanced senses of Daredevil. It’s a frightening and puzzling experience, and one that needs the scientific expertise of Hank Pym, who’d already made an immense contribution to the previous book.

Thereafter Daredevil is attacked by a hooded and cloaked ninja in colours resembling his first costume. He’s seen ninjas off in their hundreds previously, but this is someone beyond his capabilities, and it’s not every ninja prepared to resort to a baseball bat or mountaineering axe. The encounter leaves Daredevil comprehensively beaten, and worse is to come. He knows someone’s been targeting him, and what follows may be one of the strangest ever battles between a superhero and arch-enemy ever seen. Overall it’s not the finest tale Mark Waid has crafted for Daredevil, lacking a real punch to the gut surprise, but the prevailing standard has been so high that this is still worth reading.

Summing up, this is another prime slab of page-turning entertainment from Waid and Chris Samnee. The entire content along with the next two books is also available in the hardcover version of Daredevil by Mark Waid Vol 3. Alternatively, this is combined with the previous four collections as the oversized hardcover Daredevil by Mark Waid Omnibus.