Princess Adrienne’s fate was to be trapped in a tower until a suitor managed to overcome the guardian dragon and rescue her, so winning her hand in marriage. As seen in Save Yourself, that wasn’t for her. She turned the dragon, found a new friend in Bedelia, and determined to rescue her six sisters, also imprisoned in towers awaiting a suitor able to overcome their guardians. The King believes a knight has come to his castle attempting to abduct his youngest daughter, not realising this was Adrienne in armour, and Get Over Yourself opens with his instituting a competition among the best knights in the realm, offering one of his daughters in marriage to anyone who deals with the intruder.

Adrienne’s mission to rescue her sisters is now back on track, and she’s decided to start with Angela, considered the most beautiful of them. Jeremy Whitley’s pacing required adjusting over Save Yourself, but he’s now worked out the kinks, and instead of just following the one thread he’s introducing subplots and foreshadowing. There are more surprises as well.

New artist Emily Martin is an improvement by virtue of being consistent, but there are still rough edges to her art, flat faces, and some poorly proportioned people, while single page pin-ups are ill-advised mid-story. Balancing that is good storytelling, different expressions on faces, and effort put into page designs and details. She’s back for Be Yourself, but before then there’s The Pirate Princess.

Get Over Yourself provides a clever ending of a desperate threat, pours plenty of mystery into the proceedings, and broadens the cast considerably with a lot of interesting people. Some are just interesting designs, not given enough panel time to be really fleshed out beyond stereotypes, but others have a real presence to them. The sum total is a step up from the opening volume, which provides much to anticipate in what follows.