Matt’s a bit of a provocative dick, the kind of guy who doesn’t know when to shut his mouth and can’t tell when people aren’t having fun any more. It makes you kind of envious someone like that drives a prime 1960s Ford Mustang. Accompanying him in the back end of Arizona are Sheryl, who’s annoyed that they’re so far off the map, and Danni, who’s taking it a bit more calmly. Along the way they pick up hitch-hiker Dalton. That’s just before they hit the ghost town where real ghosts seem to be manifesting. Suffice to say, where the plot goes from there doesn’t improve anyone’s mood.

There’s far greater explicit adult content, but otherwise the wonderfully elegant black and white art of Francesco Francavilla brings to mind the serialised stories of the late 1970s and early 1980s British supernatural weeklies, which also used to feature refined Italian artists with admirable technique. We’re used to seeing his very individual looking colour art, but Francavilla’s equally amazing in plain black and white, really selling the horror with some memorably disturbing images.

As far as the plot goes, Rick Remender and Seth Peck don’t stretch themselves much beyond the template of the strangers arriving in a strange town where everyone seems to have murderous intent. They cope nicely with the necessities of that template, however, and there’s a novelty in Danni’s native American heritage being integral to events. Beyond that, you’ll know what to expect, and who’s going to survive their experience, so just immerse yourself and wallow in it.